Spanish introductions video
January 24, 2014
spanish words that sound similar
February 3, 2014

If you have the impression that you are far from pronouncing like a native speaker… you’ll find this Spanish pronunciation tips helpful. and, even if you are getting right all Spanish sounds, you may have the impression you are far from pronouncing like a native speaker.

Why? There are a few reasons for that, but here’s one tip: in Spanish, as in other Roman languages, like Italian or Portuguese, speakers join one word to the next every time is possible, that is, when there’s a vowel at the end of a word or at the beginning of the following word. This is not something typicall of very coloquial speaking, but an everyday thing that Spanish speakers do no matter the context or situation.

Here are some examples. You can have a look at them. Try to listen to the audio, as we did last time, to get the difference. Then, read the sentences out loud.

[wpaudio url=”http://www.elinqua.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/pronounciationtips.mp3″ text=”Listen and read” dl=”0″]

If you like, you can record yourself and send us your audio in MP3. We’ll make some corrections and send it back. Listening to yourself is a great way to detect your own mistakes and work on them! And, if you wish to learn more, remember you can try one of ELINQUA’s online classes (Spanish lessons via Skype).Pronunciation is hard, even in Spanish, and, even if you are getting right all Spanish sounds, you may have the impression you are far from pronouncing like a native speaker.

Why? There are a few reasons for that, but here’s one tip: in Spanish, as in other Roman languages, like Italian or Portuguese, speakers join one word to the next every time is possible, that is, when there’s a vowel at the end of a word or at the beginning of the following word. This is not something typicall of very coloquial speaking, but an everyday thing that Spanish speakers do no matter the context or situation.

Here are some examples. You can have a look at them. Try to listen to the audio, as we did last time, to get the difference. Then, read the sentences out loud.

[wpaudio url=”http://www.elinqua.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/pronounciationtips.mp3″ text=”Listen and read” dl=”0″]

If you like, you can record yourself and send us your audio in MP3. We’ll make some corrections and send it back. Listening to yourself is a great way to detect your own mistakes and work on them! And, if you wish to learn more, remember you can try one of ELINQUA’s online classes (Spanish lessons via Skype).Pronounciation is hard, even in Spanish, and, even if you are getting right all Spanish sounds, you may have the impression you are far from pronouncing like a native speaker.

Why? There are a few reasons for that, but here’s one tip: in Spanish, as in other Roman languages, like Italian or Portuguese, speakers join one word to the next every time is possible, that is, when there’s a vowel at the end of a word or at the beginning of the following word. This is not something typicall of very coloquial speaking, but an everyday thing that Spanish speakers do no matter the context or situation.

Here are some examples. You can have a look at them. Try to listen to the audio, as we did last time, to get the difference. Then, read the sentences out loud.

[wpaudio url=”http://www.elinqua.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/pronounciationtips.mp3″ text=”Listen and read” dl=”0″]

If you like, you can record yourself and send us your audio in MP3. We’ll make some corrections and send it back. Listening to yourself is a great way to detect your own mistakes and work on them! And, if you wish to learn more, remember you can try one of ELINQUA’s online classes (Spanish lessons via Skype).